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Formal meeting (oral evidence session): Defence concepts and capabilities: from aspiration to reality

International Relations and Defence Committee
Defence concepts and capabilities: from aspiration to reality

Wednesday 25 May 2022

Start times: 10.30am (private) 10.30am (public)


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Committee to question former Chief of the Defence Staff on UK defence policy and experts in naval power on maritime security  

 

In this evidence session the Committee will continue its assessment of the Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper.

General Sir Nick Carter, who was Chief of the Defence Staff when the Review was published, will be asked to give his views on whether, one year later, the ambitions of the two documents are still feasible.

The Committee will also probe maritime defence experts on the role of the Royal Navy in the Government’s defence and security ambitions. 

Meeting details

At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Inquiry Defence concepts and capabilities: from aspiration to reality
Former Chief (2018 - 2021) at Defence Staff
At 11.30am: Oral evidence
Inquiry Defence concepts and capabilities: from aspiration to reality
Senior Fellow for Naval Forces and Maritime Security at International Institute for Strategic Studies
Research Fellow, Sea Power at RUSI

Possible Questions:

  • Does the UK have adequate resources, including money, equipment and people, to translate all of the ambitions of those the Integrated Review and Defence Command paper into effective policy? If not, what should we focus on?
  • The Defence Command Paper announced a further reduction to the size of the Army to 72,500. Is this an adequate size for the challenges the UK faces? Does the UK need to reconsider the role and purpose of the Army in light of its reduced size?
  • The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper gave the Royal Navy a leading role in the UK’s security posture. Are the objectives set out by both documents achievable? Are the Royal Navy’s current capabilities – including its fleet, weapons, and enablers – sufficient to meet these ambitions? 
  • What are the immediate and longer-term maritime security threats that result from the war in Ukraine and broader NATO-Russia confrontation? How well is the Royal Navy prepared and equipped to address them? Do such Euro-Atlantic threats jeopardise the ambition for an Indo-Pacific ‘tilt’?
  • How would you interpret the ‘Persistent Engagement’ model as mentioned in the Defence Command Paper? What might such a model look like, particularly in the Indo-Pacific, and what is your assessment of such an approach? What would be the role of UK maritime forces?
  • What are the practical implications of the trilateral deal between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States (AUKUS) for the Royal Navy and UK maritime sector?

Location

Room 4, Palace of Westminster

How to attend