[MAC0022]

Written evidence submitted by Merseyside Police and Merseyside PCC (MAC0022)

 

 

The following evidence is submitted on behalf of Merseyside Police, with further input from the Merseyside Police and Crime Commissioner from page 5.  This evidence seeks to address the two issues for which new submissions are welcome:

 

 

Evidence Submission

      Stop and Search:  volumes and trends by function, and if necessary, by individual; outcomes; disproportionality; grounds for stop and search; use of body worn video; and section 60s.

      Use of Force: volume and trend of tactics used (including taser); reasons for use of force; impact factors; police assaults; location e.g. custody.

      Complaints.          

      Reduced the level of authorisation required for a Section 60 from Senior Officer to Inspector.

      Lowered the degree of certainty required by the authorising officer so they must reasonably believe an incident involving serious violence ‘may’, rather than ‘will’, occur.

Stop Search

Ethnicity

Apr 2019 - Mar 2020

%

Population

Per 1,000 Pop.

White

27,811

82%

1,330,716

20.90

BAME

1,635

5%

86,109

18.99

Not Known

4,423

13%

 

 

Total

33,869

100%

1,416,825

23.90

Use of Force

Ethnicity

Apr 2019 - Mar 2020

%

Population

Per 1,000 Pop.

White

6,238

90%

1,330,716

4.69

BAME

414

6%

86,109

4.81

Not Known

252

4%

 

 

Total

6,904

100%

1,416,825

4.87

Taser Use

Ethnicity

Apr 2019 - Mar 2020

%

Population

Per 1,000 Pop.

White

308

91%

1,330,716

0.23

BAME

24

7%

86,109

0.28

Not Known

6

2%

 

 

Total

338

100%

1,416,825

0.24

Use of Covid FPNs

Ethnicity

Lockdown Period
to date

%

Population

Per 1,000 Pop.

White

419

81%

1,330,716

0.31

BAME

32

6%

86,109

0.37

Not Known

66

13%

 

 

Total

517

100%

1,416,825

0.36

 

      Investigation Daily Management Meeting:  emphasis on repeat victims/severity of case/hate crime towards officers and staff.

      Force One Team meetingAll repeat hate crimes /key issues around vulnerability in each local policing areaThis meeting considers appropriate prioritisation and allocation of resources.

      Local Policing/Investigations meetingAgain hate crimes are dissected at these meetings.

      Met with the BAME Chair, to discuss current challenges relating to Black Lives Matters and the Coronavirus.  A video of this meeting was made accessible to all staff via the Force intranet.  Key issues covered:

      Health concerns of BAME staff regarding the disproportionate impact of Covid 19;

      Views re ‘taking the Knee’;

      The recruitment, retention and progression of BAME staff; and

      The increase in hate crime against officers and staff.

      Made himself available via a skype meeting, to continue an open dialogue with all staff by providing an opportunity for staff to ask questions regarding current issues.

 

Merseyside PCC’s Evidence

 

The following evidence is submitted on behalf of Merseyside Police and Crime Commissioner’s office and seeks to address the two issues for which new submissions are welcome:

 

Since 2015 the organisation Stop Hate UK (SHUK) has been delivering Third-Party Hate Crime reporting services in Merseyside, and they remain the recommended provider for this service during 2018/21.

SHUK provides independent, confidential and accessible reporting and support for victims, witnesses and third parties. In Merseyside SHUK has also delivered other services including training and education inputs to officers and staff. SHUK’s core activities also include awareness-raising, campaigning and delivering projects on a variety of issues relevant to Hate Crime and equality. They are well known within the Merseyside region, are also commissioned by Merseyside Local Authorities, and are a vital link between victims and the PCC’s other commissioned Hate Crime support services. The service has received extra support during Covid 19 Lockdown period and their contact information has been distributed at Black Lives Matter protests and via social media.

This service provides the facility for victims, whether they wish to engage with the police/report a crime or not, and be referred into a support provision tailored to their individual need.

Hate Crime Support Services

Since 2015 the provision of Hate Crime services on behalf of the PCC has been delivered by the Anthony Walker Foundation (AWF), based in Liverpool City Centre. AWF is a registered charity established by Anthony's family after his racially motivated murder in 2005.

The aims and objectives of the charity are to promote racial harmony through education, sport and the arts, promoting the celebration of diversity and personal integrity and the realisation of the potential of all young people. AWF operates locally, regionally and nationally but the priority focus is Merseyside. On behalf of the PCC, AWF has delivered counselling and support for victims subjected to Hate Crime, but has also acted as a referring agency to other organisations that may be able to better manage unique aspects of victimisation, according to the victim’s needs.  AWF has good links to Stop Hate UK, Merseyside Police and many other Hate Crime services in Merseyside. The charity has also received extra support to cope with lockdown challenges.

During the Victim Needs Assessment (VNA) activity that the OPCC conducted during 2017 it became clear that additional funding was required to enable a fully inclusive service to all victims of Hate Crime, whatever their need.

The following services are commissioned by the PCC:-

 

The provision of Hate Crime services is of vital importance to the communities of Merseyside. The increase in funding that is available to deliver this provision on behalf of the PCC will increase the capacity for Hate Crime support across the region.

Following a successful pilot involving video badges for local businesses who had suffered repeated anti-social behaviour or racially aggravated offences, the PCC secured MOJ funding to extend this scheme. The cameras are made available to repeat victims, and serves as a reassurance to the victim and a deterrent to would be offenders.  It provides useful evidence of offending behaviour.

The PCC’s Community Engagement Team have strong links into the communities on Merseyside. During the lockdown period other platforms to engage such as social media, Zoom, Teams and Skype have been utilised. This enabled regular contact with our Muslim communities during Ramadan and Eid and sharing Stop Hate UK materials, similarly with our Chinese community who initially saw a rise in hate crime towards them during the early stages of Covid 19. The team contacted our Chinese students via the Universities to ensure they knew that hate crime is not to be tolerated and how to report hate crimes.

The team have links into local partnerships and elected members and keep the PCC informed of what the communities’ priorities are. There was representation on the BLM protest and recent engagement is looking to improve the diversity of our Youth Ambassadors. The Ambassadors will have their equality training via Zoom in the first instance until restrictions allow otherwise. The PCC is represented by her Community Engagement Team in the Local Policing Teams Threat Harm and Risk meetings in order to inform her of community tensions and other community safety issues in each local authority across the county.

The PCC is kept abreast of the Force’s recruitment measures during her Force Inspection meetings, where she receives updates of activity in relation to positive action.

10% of the staff of the PCCs office are BAME, there are currently no vacancies to fill. Vacancies are advertised widely and include newsletters and social media groups for minority groups and those with protected characteristics within the Equality Act 2010. 

 

June 2020