CIE0063

 

Written evidence from Dr Michelle Morgan

Overview -Proposal for a staggered return to HE for new and returning students

An alternative plan to maximise recruitment, progression, retention and the success of students

We cannot assume that university life will be back to normal this autumn. This proposal provides an alternative approach in helping maximise recruitment, progression, retention, and the success of students across the sector by having a staggered return to study in 2020/21 for new and returning students. A staggered start will create confidence amongst applicants, students and staff. It is important to acknowledge that applicants and students hold the power because they can decide whether to defer or intermit- they are the lifeblood of universities. The current ‘business as normal model’ is unlikely to work because of the lack of clarity about the coming year, the concerns about the cost of studying online (but still having to pay full fees and accommodation costs), and whether campuses are safe. The student voice is currently not being put at the heart of strategy and policy making. This approach does.

 

In these uncertain times, having a sector wide agreement and a clear pragmatic plan of action that provides stability and confidence, could help all higher education establishments in the coming academic year. Consensus and consistency,  collaboration and cooperation, competitive recruitment set aside in 2020/21 and compliance flexibility will all be important.

 

A financial package of support by Government to help deliver a staggered return between October and January could include an interest free or low interest loan (paid back over a number of years).  In return, universities could provide an evidence based plan showing the practical steps they are taking to support learning delivery, and the wellbeing and safety of students and staff.  It will be essential to keep support services maintained so that the advances made in mental health and wellbeing are not lost.

Core issues for consideration in this document for a staggered return include:

  1. Obtaining the confidence of applicants, students, and staff that our campuses are ‘safe’ in teaching and study space, social areas and accommodation.

 

  1. Planning for continuation of restricted or closed borders preventing international student travel.

 

  1. Accommodation and financial loss for students and universities.

 

  1. Supporting transitions and identifying skill and confidence gaps.

 

  1. Continuation and development of online learning including the collection of ‘engagement’ data.

 

  1. Maintaining support and wellbeing provision.

 

  1. Effective space planning for curriculum delivery in the event of continuing social distancing.

 

  1. The development of effective communication strategies to keep applicants and students regularly updated, informed, engaged and connected to their studies.

 

  1. Ensuring the student voice is heard and that concerns, and worries are addressed, and appropriate support mechanisms developed and provided.

 

  1. Harnessing the ‘learnings’ from the lockdown across the sector in helping shape the future of higher education.

 

 

Rationale for staggered return to HE for new entrants and returners

Dr Michelle Morgan 3 May 2020

 

Introduction

Covid19 has created an environment that is unprecedented. Universities are working extremely hard to respond to the immediate needs of students and staff.

The impact on higher education is going to be phenomenal, both in the short and long term. This will require us to think differently in order to look after the wellbeing of our students and staff, as well as sector survival through taking action to maximise recruitment, progression, retention and the success of students. We cannot assume that university life will be back to normal this autumn so we need alternative plans to consider.

This proposal provides an alternative plan that includes a rationale for a staggered return to HE for new entrants and returners, core issues that may need to be considered, and some overarching activities that could support this course of action.

 

The next academic year

We do not know when self-isolating and social distancing measures will start to be lifted, but it is clear that social mixing will not resume for a long time and when it does, it will take a while to adjust.  More than ever, this is the time when the HE sector needs to come to a consensus, and agree a pragmatic plan of action that provides stability and confidence in helping HEIs move forward together in these uncertain times.

Paul Ashwin, Professor of Education at Lancaster University argues a sectorwide approach is essential saying ‘You can’t leave this to the market. You can’t leave it to the interests of individual institutions. You have to have some coordination by policy makers that actually looks out for the health of the sector as a whole rather than letting the strongest and most dominant voices, which tend to be prestigious institutions,  fight for a system that suits them, but severely hurts other institutions’.[1]    

The concern is that applicants and students who are advantaged because they have access to economic, social and cultural capital will be more likely to succeed than those that don’t.  A disaster due to Covid19, would be for the widening participation agenda that areas of the sector have worked so hard to achieve, would suffer and this will be damaging for society. Allowing universities to fail, especially those that have a high proportion of widening participation students who are pivotal to local and regional economies, would be damaging for the national economy.[2]

We also need to be mindful that in 2020/21, the population under 18 years of age will decline by a further 2%, so recruitment will be even more challenging across all domiciled groups.[3]

To help applicants and students, and universities reduce inequalities and inequities, policy makers and universities adopting a 6 C’s approach could help achieve a more stable HE environment and continue to deliver in uncertain circumstances. They are:

 

Universities are under huge financial pressure as highlighted in the recent UUK proposal.[4]  The financial year will remain unchanged, but a staggered start will impact on cashflow. So could a balanced package of financial support include a free or low interest loan to help fund the staggered return between October to January, which universities could pay back over a few years as suggested by David Kernohan, Associate Editor of Wonkhe? [5] Could the profile of payments from the Student Loan Company be changed? For example, the first two terms for returning students could be paid in the first term and the necessary adjustments made in the third?

A requirement could be an evidence based plan showing the practical steps universities are taking to support their students and staff? In the panic and scramble to keep everything moving, it will be essential to keep support services maintained so that the advances made in mental health and wellbeing are not lost.

There are a number of core issues to be addressed to enable the HE sector to put in place a meaningful and pragmatic plan for a staggered return to study in 2020/21.

 

Core issues to consider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The staggered academic year

To maximise recruitment, progression, retention and the success of our students, they could be phased back to HE over a term. Many universities have two or three intakes a year at undergraduate and postgraduate taught level (Sept/Oct, Jan and Apr), but the last two (winter and spring intake) generally are much smaller in number. Commonly, the different entry cohorts are taught together. For many universities, combining the September/October and January intakes for new Level 4 and PGT students could be very possible.  Importantly, we will need to support our returning students and put in place a learning ‘scaffolded’ return to university.

 

Detailed examples of suggested structures of the academic year for new UG and PGT in January, and returners in October can be found in appendix 1. No approach will be perfect so a compromise by all stakeholders will be required with everyone’s expectations and aspirations being carefully managed.

 

 

 

 

 

Returning students (including students on placement 19/20)  and direct entry applicants going into Levels 5 and 6 could start in mid to late October.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Level 3 and 4 undergraduate and PGT entrants could start mid January. However, it may be that an October start is required for some courses such as nursing especially if a university doesn’t have a January intake. This staggered approach  provides potential numerous benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding current students concerns and those of entry and re-entry students 20/21

Students will understand why schools and universities had to close in March and for alternative assessments to be put in place this academic year. However, they may be less understanding if universities do not listen to their learning, support and mental health concerns this coming academic year. Students are making a huge financial investment in their education and if it appears that mechanisms are not being put in place to support their interests, they may decide to intermit, change universities (especially to ones nearer to home) or withdraw from university study altogether. This will  further increase the financial burden on universities.

We will need to consider what data should be collected to help inform our work over and above what is already collected. However, the data needs to be meaningful.[10] Data could include how students engaged with the emergency online learning and assessment, and how they fared in terms of  assessment outcome in compariosn to their other assessments.    

Understanding new entrants’ and returners’ concerns about their prior learning experience and upcoming study before they make the transition, will also be critical.  A Pre-arrival Academic Questionnaire (PAQ) could assist with this. Like a lot of pre-arrival work, it will be voluntary but an explanation of how it will help them, their course leaders and the university will be provided.[11]

Activities to help the staggered return

Below is a list of activities that could be undertaken and why. Hopefully, they will help instill confidence in students and staff that their campus is safe, and that social distancing is being respected and delivered, and slowly phased out when appropriate.  The five key areas below that interlink are all critical in delivering a high-quality student experience.[12] Could AdvanceHE be the hub that collates examples of good practice across these key areas?

 

We need to be mindful of the emotional and mental health impact of lockdown and Covid19 on our applicants, students, 2019/20 graduates and staff. The NUS Covid19 report undertaken at the start of April 2020 highlights the concerns and stresses of current students. Working in collaboration with NUS, Student Minds and the NHS, guidance, advice and support that is already being created could be collated for distribution across the sector. With potentially  more students and staff being exposed to grief and bereavement due to Covid19, increasing provision for support may be prudent. Adopting a variety of mechanisms to distribute information will be helpful (e.g. VLE, email, text, hardcopy, social media platforms). Assumptions cannot be made that all students will have easy access to resources, and it is important to recognise that a distressed student may not have the mental capacity to access information online. The University Mental Health Charter launched by Student Minds last December would be an excellent framework to use in the development of support, advice and information.[13] Thinking about and addressing the implications of support and wellbeing in the key areas below will be critical.

 

When considering whether to continue with online learning or alternative assessments, it will be advisable to collect and analyse data regarding student engagement in these emergency activities this academic year and note the gaps.[14] Moving to online provision in a hurry and using digital tools will not necessarily equate to a quality assured, high quality, engaging, and inclusive experience for our diverse student body.

 

Due to exams being cancelled in 2019/20 for secondary and university students and alternative assessments put in place, we may see an increase in failure rates at the next level of study when it comes to examinations. For many courses, examinations are either the main form of assessment (e.g. most A-Levels) or a significant part of it. Introducing summative assessments that account for a small percentage of the overall grade could therefore help with their main exam preparation. Reviewing the assessment structure rather than just rolling over the previous year’s will be essential in ensuring they are fit for purpose for these cohorts. Additional support may be needed during the run up to exam period from tutors and professional service colleagues. The returners could be looked at early September and Level 4 and PGTs during the Autumn term. Covid19 has required us to quickly become innovative in evolving traditional methods of assessment and the provision of support, some of which may continue. Brown and Sambell’s Covid19 Guides entitled Fifty tips for replacements for time-constrained, invigilated on-site exams’ [15] and Contingency planning exploring rapid alternatives to face-to-face assessment[16] provide a range of suggestions.

In the coming year, central university academic support units will be essential in supporting and enabling staff to progress their online learning and support provision.  Continuing professional development in this area will become even more important and will require investment in technology for staff and students both on and off campus. Pulling together good learning, teaching and assessment activities that worked, will be valuable.

 

We will have final year undergraduate and postgraduate taught cohorts who will get a non-traditional degree. They will become Covid19 graduates and it will be a unique club. Preparing current students and final year students in 20/21 to complete their studies and leave university (Outduction) [17] is going to be more important than ever especially as the employment market, due to Covid19, is expected to dramatically reduce.[18]

For current students, the activities and information that would ordinarily take place face to face, such as revision and supervision  activities and career and employment and advice, can no longer happen. Also putting effective Outduction support mechanisms in place for students who withdraw or decide to intermit will help them make informed choices.

Universities across the sector are putting in place ‘no detriment’ policies also known as the ‘safety net’ to support students and to allay their fears about their qualification outcome and future employment opportunities. But how will our graduates (both UG and PGT) come to terms with  the emergency assessment put in place which they may feel does not reflect their true potential?  How do we prevent them experiencing Imposter Syndrome on completion because they havent graduated in the traditional way?

We don’t know how employers will view our 2020 graduates as their transcripts will be very different to the norm, but including an explanation with the transcript explaining how the classification was calculated could help employers. This would give the graduate the choice of including it in a job application. This year, the Higher Educational Achievement Record could prove particularly beneficial for many undergraduate students as it will provide a full record of a student’s  academic and extra-curricular learning and experience achievements.  Careers services are already being creative by moving support online through the use of vlogs, podcasts, online chats and virtual workshops to help students adapt their career plans.[19] Employability advice could include highlighting the extra skills this cohort may have achieved as a result of Covid19 such as resilience, dealing with uncertainty and ability to adapt. These are all skills employers want and need! By providing examples of how they can demonstrate this in a supporting statement would be invaluable.

However, the challenge is ensuring all students have access to these resources which means we cannot rely solely on online support. Could we utilise/extend our Alumni networks and other peer to peer support groups in providing support and mentoring? A range of information, advice and support could be included in a ‘What Next – Preparing to leave’ handbook that is saved as a word document or PDF and placed on the VLE,  sent via university and personal email to all students, and where requested, a hard copy posted.[20] As well as employability advice, it can include a farewell message, re-entry support and information, useful ‘personal’ and ‘leaving university’ checklists, mental health and wellbeing guidance, and graduation information.

 

Alumni

Universities all have Alumni departments, and Alumnus are usually allowed to use careers and sports facilities for up to three years after graduation. But what can we do about supporting the mental health and wellbeing of this cohort post study? In the last year, universities have been working hard on developing wellbeing and mental health support, but it is generally for their current students and only applicable during term time . We have no idea the impact the decisions made regarding final classifications will have on our students nor how they will respond once the current crisis has passed and they adjust to a ‘new’ normal. We will have graduates, especially young people,  who are hurtling towards a labour market cliff due to a scaling back of graduate programmes. We will have graduating nurses and doctors who are being released early from their studies to support the pandemic crisis and are entering an environment that is like a battlefield.   We will have care leavers and estranged graduates who have no networks to support them. We have a moral imperative to support our graduates.

Working with the NHS and mental health charities such as Student Minds, wellbeing and mental health advice with relevant signposting could be put on Alumni sites. This could include information on how to identify mental health issues and access support. There could be generic advice which all university alumni sites post, and bespoke which covers specific information on the local or regional support available.

Conclusion

None of us can predict what the new academic year will hold for us,  for our students and for all other stakeholders. However, we are doing ourselves a major disservice if we don’t explore pragmatic solutions to maximise the opportunities for student learning and particularly retention. Only in this way will we keep universities viable and effective environments.

 

Acknowledgments

Many thanks to the following colleagues for their thoughts and comments in the production of this proposal.

 

Special thanks to Professor Sally Brown, Eve Alcock and Dr Diane Nutt.

 

In alphabetical order:

Eve Alcock (SU President, University of Bath)

Professor Sally Brown (Emerita Professor at Leeds Beckett University and HE Consultant)

Dr Nick Freestone (Associate Professor, Kingston University)

Mike Grey (Head of University Partnerships, Gradconsult)

Professor Debbie Holley (Professor of Learning Innovation, Bournemouth University)

Gareth Hughes (Mental Health and Transitions Specialist)

Professor Deborah Lock (University of Lincoln)

Dr Diane Nutt (HE Learning and Teaching Consultant and Chair of the European First Year Experience Network)

Dr Emily McIntosh (Director of Learning and Teaching, Middlesex University)

Marcia Ody MBE (PASS Expert and Independent Education Consultant)

Jenny Shaw (Student Experience Director, The UNITE Group)

Andy Youell (Writer, Speaker, Strategic Data Advisor)

 

 

 

Appendix 1   Covid Academic year 2020.21             

                                                                     

The timeline below enables a staggered start for returners and new students. By staggering the examination periods for each group, it should enable a faster turn around of results. The timeline provides time for holiday and marking. Resit assessments could be more creative such as reworking the exam paper as coursework and setting a 60% plus pass mark.                                                                                   

For all UGs, the academic year will be complete by the end of Aug/start of Sept 2021. This allows all new and returning UGs in 2021/22 to return in the first to second week of Oct. This will almost be a return to the standard academic year. For all PGTs, their academic year will officially end in December. However, new PGTs can start in Oct which will be a return to the standard academic year.                                                                                   

Ordinarily, Sept PGT starters finish in a year but January starter's take approximately 18 months. For this cohort, it will be important to complete them in a year so the normal 2 cycle approach can resume in October. As January PGTs will be working on their final project in a variety of places, hopefully library spaces and general study spaces will cope. This schedule can be tweaked by institution.

 

Level 5 and 6 returners and direct entry students Oct start

 

W/S

 

 

 

Monday

Friday

 

 

05-Oct

09-Oct

 

 

12-Oct

16-Oct

week1

 

19-Oct

23-Oct

week2

 

26-Oct

30-Oct

week3

 

02-Nov

06-Nov

week4

 

09-Nov

13-Nov

week5

 

16-Nov

20-Nov

week6

 

23-Nov

27-Nov

week7

 

30-Nov

04-Dec

week8

 

07-Dec

11-Dec

week9

 

14-Dec

18-Dec

week10

 

21-Dec

08-Jan

Xmas Break

 

11-Jan

15-Jan

week 11 Revision classes

 

18-Jan

22-Jan

week 12 Revision classes

 

25-Jan

29-Jan

Exams

 

01-Feb

05-Feb

Exams

 

08-Feb

12-Feb

week 1 Online classes

 

15-Feb

19-Feb

week 2 plus sem 1 exam boards

22-Feb

26-Feb

week 3

 

01-Mar

05-Mar

week 4

 

08-Mar

12-Mar

week 5

 

15-Mar

19-Mar

week 6

 

22-Mar

26-Mar

week 7

 

29-Mar

02-Apr

Easter break

 

06-Apr

09-Apr

Easter break

 

12-Apr

16-Apr

week 8

 

19-Apr

23-Apr

week 9

 

26-Apr

30-Apr

week 10

 

03-May

07-May

week 11

 

10-May

14-May

week 12 Revision classes

 

17-May

21-May

Independent revision

 

24-May

28-May

Exams

 

31-May

04-Jun

Exams

 

07-Jun

11-Jun

 

 

14-Jun

18-Jun

 

 

21-Jun

25-Jun

Exam boards

 

28-Jun

02-Jul

 

 

05-Jul

09-Jul

 

 

12-Jul

16-Jul

 

 

19-Jul

23-Jul

Resits

 

26-Jul

30-Jul

 

 

02-Aug

06-Aug

 

 

09-Aug

13-Aug

 

 

16-Aug

20-Aug

 

 

23-Aug

27-Aug

 

 

30-Aug

03-Sep

Resit Exam boards

 

06-Sep

10-Sep

 

 

13-Sep

17-Sep

 

 

20-Sep

24-Sep

 

 

27-Sep

01-Oct

 

 

04-Oct

08-Oct

Start of new academic year

 

11-Oct

15-Oct

 

 

 

 

 

Level 3 and 4 new Sept entrants (January start)

W/S

 

 

Monday

Friday

 

05-Oct

09-Oct

 

12-Oct

16-Oct

 

19-Oct

23-Oct

 

26-Oct

30-Oct

 

02-Nov

06-Nov

 

09-Nov

13-Nov

 

16-Nov

20-Nov

 

23-Nov

27-Nov

 

30-Nov

04-Dec

 

07-Dec

11-Dec

Pre-arrival preparation and welcome online

14-Dec

18-Dec

Pre-arrival preparation- reading and online lectures

21-Dec

08-Jan

Pre-arrival preparation- reading and online lectures

11-Jan

15-Jan

Arrival week on campus including Freshers wk

18-Jan

22-Jan

week 1 Face to face teaching

25-Jan

29-Jan

week 2

01-Feb

05-Feb

week 3

08-Feb

12-Feb

week 4

15-Feb

19-Feb

week 5

22-Feb

26-Feb

week 6

01-Mar

05-Mar

week 7

08-Mar

12-Mar

week 8

15-Mar

19-Mar

week 9

22-Mar

26-Mar

week 10 Revision classes

29-Mar

02-Apr

Easter break/ independent revision

06-Apr

09-Apr

Easter break/ independent revision

12-Apr

16-Apr

Exams

19-Apr

23-Apr

Exams

26-Apr

30-Apr

Week 1 Online classes

03-May

07-May

week 2 plus sem 1 exam boards

10-May

14-May

week 3

17-May

21-May

week 4

24-May

28-May

week 5

31-May

04-Jun

week 6

07-Jun

11-Jun

week 7

14-Jun

18-Jun

week 8

21-Jun

25-Jun

week 9

28-Jun

02-Jul

week 10

05-Jul

09-Jul

week 11 Revision classes

12-Jul

16-Jul

Exams

19-Jul

23-Jul

 

26-Jul

30-Jul

Exam board sem 2 and progression

02-Aug

06-Aug

 

09-Aug

13-Aug

Resit students rework exam paper

16-Aug

20-Aug

as C/W/ other alternative assess

23-Aug

27-Aug

 

30-Aug

03-Sep

 

06-Sep

10-Sep

Resit Exam board

13-Sep

17-Sep

 

20-Sep

24-Sep

 

27-Sep

01-Oct

 

04-Oct

08-Oct

Start of new academic year

11-Oct

15-Oct

 

 

 

Postgraduate Taught Sept entrants (January start inclusive of the normal ‘January’ intake)

W/S

 

 

Monday

Friday

 

05-Oct

09-Oct

 

12-Oct

16-Oct

 

19-Oct

23-Oct

 

26-Oct

30-Oct

 

02-Nov

06-Nov

 

09-Nov

13-Nov

 

16-Nov

20-Nov

 

23-Nov

27-Nov

 

30-Nov

04-Dec

 

07-Dec

11-Dec

Pre-arrival preparation and welcome online

14-Dec

18-Dec

Pre-arrival preparation- reading and online lectures

21-Dec

08-Jan

Pre-arrival preparation- reading and online lectures

11-Jan

15-Jan

Arrival week on campus including Freshers wk

18-Jan

22-Jan

week 1 Face to face teaching

25-Jan

29-Jan

week 2

01-Feb

05-Feb

week 3

08-Feb

12-Feb

week 4

15-Feb

19-Feb

week 5

22-Feb

26-Feb

week 6

01-Mar

05-Mar

week 7

08-Mar

12-Mar

week 8

15-Mar

19-Mar

week 9

22-Mar

26-Mar

week 10 Revision classes

29-Mar

02-Apr

Easter break/ independent revision

06-Apr

09-Apr

Easter break/ independent revision

12-Apr

16-Apr

Exams

19-Apr

23-Apr

Exams

26-Apr

30-Apr

Week 1 Online classes

03-May

07-May

week 2 plus sem 1 exam boards

10-May

14-May

week 3

17-May

21-May

week 4

24-May

28-May

week 5

31-May

04-Jun

week 6

07-Jun

11-Jun

week 7

14-Jun

18-Jun

week 8

21-Jun

25-Jun

week 9

28-Jun

02-Jul

week 10

05-Jul

09-Jul

week 11 Revision classes

12-Jul

16-Jul

Independent revision

19-Jul

23-Jul

Independent revision

26-Jul

30-Jul

Exams

02-Aug

06-Aug

Exams

09-Aug

13-Aug

 

16-Aug

20-Aug

 

23-Aug

27-Aug

 

30-Aug

03-Sep

Exam board

06-Sep

10-Sep

Final project

13-Sep

17-Sep

Final project

20-Sep

24-Sep

Final project

27-Sep

01-Oct

Final project

04-Oct

08-Oct

Final project

11-Oct

15-Oct

Final project

18-Oct

22-Oct

Final project

25-Oct

29-Oct

Final project

01-Nov

05-Nov

Final project

08-Nov

12-Nov

Final project

15-Nov

19-Nov

Final project

22-Nov

26-Nov

Final project

29-Nov

03-Dec

Final project submission

06-Dec

10-Dec

Marking of final project

13-Dec

17-Dec

Marking of final project

20-Dec

24-Dec

 

27-Dec

31-Dec

 

03-Jan-22

07-Jan-22

 

 

10-Jan

 

14-Jan

 

Exam boards

17-Jan

21-Jan

 

24-Jan

28-Jan

 

31-Jan

04-Feb

 

07-Feb

11-Feb

Retake period (comes after UG)

14-Feb

18-Feb

 

21-Feb

25-Feb

 

28-Feb

04-Mar

Resit exam boards

                                                                                   

 

May 2020

17

 


[1] Ashwin, P. (2020) Wonkhe PODCAST: Bailouts, admissions, September, 23 April 2020 available by going to: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/wonkhe-show-s06e01/

 

[2] Hardy, E. (2020) Regional universities in the UK cannot be allowed to fail, 30 April, Available: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/blog/regional-universities-uk-cannot-be-allowed-fail

[3] Curnock-Cook, M. (2020)  A student-centric bailout for universities, 15 April, Available: https://www.hepi.ac.uk/2020/04/15/a-student-centric-bailout-for-universities/

[4] Universities UK 92020) Achieving stability in the higher education sector following Covid19, 10 April. Available https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/news/Documents/uuk_achieving-stability-higher-education-april-2020.pdf#search=Achieving%20stability

[5] Kernohan, D. (2020) How do we get a loan? 2 May,  Available: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/how-do-we-get-to-a-loan/

[6] National Union of Students (2020) NUS Coronavirus Survey, Available: https://www.nusconnect.org.uk/nus-uk/coronavirus-covid-19-hub/student-safety-net

 

[7] Morgan, M. and Direito, I. (2016) Widening and sustaining postgraduate taught (PGT) STEM study in the UK: a collaborative project. Creating change through understanding expectations and attitudes towards PGT study, experiences and post-study outcomes from the perspective of applicants, students, universities and employers. Available at:  http://www.postgradexperience.org/project-docs/

 

[8] Morgan, M. (2020 Bridging the gap between secondary and tertiary education. Available online at: http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/library/UG_documents/Bridging_the_gap_between_secondary_and_tertiary_education-Morgan_2020.pdf

 

[9] Information on The Student Experience Transitions Model, Available: http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/student-practitioner-model/SET-stages/

[10] Kernohan, D. (2020) Covid-19 will last a long time in regulatory data, 26 March, https://wonkhe.com/blogs/covid-19-will-last-a-long-time-in-regulatory-data/

[11] Information on the PAQ is available by going to: http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/essential-information/useful-resources/

[12] Key themes/areas http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/student-practitioner-model/themes-in-the-set/

[13] Student Minds University Mental Health Charter https://www.studentminds.org.uk/charter.html and Student Minds Covid19 advice https://www.studentminds.org.uk/coronavirus.html

[14] Krohn, A (2020) Remote learning will expose gaps in digital learning experiences, 26 April 2020. Available at: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/remote-learning-will-expose-gaps-in-digital-learning-experiences

[15] Sambell, K. and Brown, S. (2020) Fifty tips for replacements for time-constrained, invigilated on-site exams, March 2020, Available: Kay-Sambell-Sally-Brown-Coronavirus-Contingency-Suggestions-for-replacing-on-site-exams-w.docx (353 downloads)

[16] Sambell, K. and Brown, S. (2020) Contingency planning: exploring rapid alternatives to face-to-face assessment, Available: https://sally-brown.net/download/3122/

[17] Information on The Student Experience Transitions Model, Available: http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/student-practitioner-model/SET-stages/

[18] Hooley, T. (2020)  Redefining the employability agenda in the age of Covid-19, 11 April, Available: https://www.hepi.ac.uk/2020/04/11/redefining-the-employability-agenda-in-the-age-of-covid-19/

[19] Binnie, G. (2020)  Resilience in adversity: supporting graduate careers during Covid-19, 7 April, https://wonkhe.com/blogs/resilience-in-adversity-supporting-graduate-careers-during-covid-19/

[20] Examples are available: http://www.improvingthestudentexperience.com/essential-information/useful-resources/