Written evidence from Stellantis (ELV0038)

 

Deadline: Friday 15th September 2023, 17:00

This submission is sent from Stellantis.

We are the third largest automaker globally. Stellantis encompasses the Vauxhall, Peugeot, Citroën, Fiat, DS Automobiles, Jeep, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, Abarth and Fiat Professional brands in the UK. Stellantis employs over 5,000 people across a number of sites including our two key manufacturing sites in Ellesmere Port and Luton.

We have an ambitious electrification roadmap for our brands, are committed to respecting regulation in force in the UK and throughout Europe whilst ensuring accessible freedom of mobility for all.

Stellantis is committed to achieve 100% zero emission new vehicle sales in the UK and Europe by 2030.  Our range will progressively move towards 100% electric, well ahead of legislation. For example, Fiat, Alfa Romeo and DS Automobiles becoming fully electric by 2027 and Vauxhall by 2028. We are aligned with the UK Government’s ambitions. Furthermore, ahead of the competition, as outlined in our Dare Forward 2030 plan, we will be carbon net zero by 2038.

We welcome the opportunity to provide input into the Lords Environment and Climate Change Committee call for evidence into Electric Vehicles.

 

Government approaches

  1. What are the main obstacles to the achievement of the Government’s 2030 and 2035 phase-out dates? Are the phase-out dates realistic and achievable? If not, what steps should the Government take to make the phase-out dates achievable?

Stellantis is committed to achieve 100% zero emission new passenger car in the UK and Europe by 2030, across all of our Brands including Vauxhall, Peugeot, Fiat and Citroen, so we are aligned with the UK Government’s ambitions.

 

However, we need certainty and regulatory clarity on the pathway that the Government will set. We need a holistic cross Government departmental plan for strong support for the industry in making the necessary investments in the whole electric vehicle value chain in the UK.

 

With reference specifically to the ZEV Mandate, given short timeframes and potential operational risks for implementation by January 2024, we believe that a ‘monitoring only’ approach to the first year (2024) is necessary.

 

It should also be acknowledged that this new regulation is coming into force at the same time as manufacturers are facing the tightening of the Rules of Origin and continued uncertainty over the localised battery supply chain.

 

The external environment conditions must be conducive, in the short term and the longer term, enabling us to meet the proposed annual trajectory ZEV targets for cars and vans. Citing SMMT data, in Q1 2023 BEV new car sales were -12.5% below expectations. It is also worth noting that private BEV volumes were also down in Q1 2023 by -13.8%. In addition, in Q1 2023 concerningly for the LCV / van market, the trajectory which has sharpened the most in the ZEV Mandate targets, is -30.4% below expectations.

 

There are several external factors in the longer term, that may see the EV market continue to soften and need to be considered: Continued high energy costs in the UK and therefore the cost of running an EV, increasing raw materials costs will continue to put pressure on costs, these risk the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) being above an ICE vehicle.

 

There needs to be greater confidence in the charging infrastructure and transparency of pricing at public chargers. We believe the binding targets for ZEV roll out must be underpinned by equally ambitious and binding targets for EV charging infrastructure for both cars and vans. We believe there should be, in parallel with the new regulatory framework, a mandate for infrastructure deployment, with the aim to harmonise the increase of charging infrastructure with EV volume ramp up.

 

To further support EV adoption, we would like to see continued targeted fiscal support for zero emission car and van customers both domestic and business and would like to see a review of motoring taxes to ensure the transition to EVs is assured.

  1. Do the 2030 and 2035 phase-out dates serve their purpose to incentivise the development of an EV market in the UK? To what extent are car makers focusing on one date or the other? What are the impacts of the deadlines on the ability of the UK supply chain to benefit and how could the Government seek to further support the development of the UK EV industry? Would the introduction of a plan with key dates and timescales support the development of the EV industry in the UK?

Stellantis is committed to achieve 100% zero emission new car sales in the UK and Europe by 2030.  Our range will progressively move towards 100% electric, well ahead of legislation. For example, Fiat, Alfa Romeo and DS becoming fully electric by 2027 and Vauxhall by 2028. Considering our planning and development cycles (5-7 years) we have been targeting 2030, to ensure compliance with legislation. If the date changes to 2035, Stellantis will be at a disadvantage potentially missing out on revenue from ICE vehicles sales and production in the UK.

We noted the recent news of the Tata Gigafactory in the UK, as underpinning the competitiveness of UK manufacturing is the need for a stable and local electrification supply chain. A competitive battery value chain is needed in the UK for UK production.

As explained above, we need to have certainty and regulatory clarity on the pathway that the Government will set. We need a holistic cross Government departmental plan, to include key dates and timescales, showing strong support for the industry in making the necessary investments in the whole electric vehicles value chain in the UK, including battery manufacturing capacity. Any plans need to take into account the automotive industry planning and development timelines.

 

  1. What specific national policies, regulations or initiatives have been successful, or have hindered, EV adoption to date? Are these policies or initiatives fit for purpose?

The plug-in car and plug-in van grant successfully supported consumer and business EV adoption, supporting the sale of nearly half a million electric cars. While the plug-in car grant has been removed, similar schemes and incentives continue to incentivise consumers across Europe1. Electric vehicle data suggests that the exponential growth of the vehicle segment in the UK is starting to slow2, while some data shows that demand for electric cars has fallen 65% year-on-year3.

To further support EV adoption, we would like to see continued targeted fiscal support for zero emission car and van customers both domestic and business and would like to see a review of motoring taxes to ensure the transition to EVs is not undermined.

As mentioned above, there needs to be greater confidence in the charging infrastructure and transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

Fiat recently launched a commercial sales initiative introducing a £3,000 Fiat e-Grant for specific Fiat models – Fiat 500e and 500e Convertible to incentivise consumer purchase. Please see the link for further information: Return of the electric car grant: FIAT reveals £3,000 incentive to get Britain's electric car revolution back on track | Fiat | Stellantis.

1Overview – Electric vehicles: tax benefits & purchase incentives in the European Union (2022) - ACEA - European Automobile Manufacturers' Association

22019 and 2020 figures: https://www.smmt.co.uk/industry-topics/sustainability/registrations/

22021: https://www.smmt.co.uk/2022/01/covid-stalls-2021-uk-new-car-market-but-record-ev-sales-show-future-direction/

22022: https://media.smmt.co.uk/december-2022-new-car-registrations/

2Year to date 2023 (nb up to April only): https://media.smmt.co.uk/april-2023-new-car-registrations/

3https://www.autotraderroadto2030.co.uk/#demand

 

  1. Given that the Government should apply a behavioural lens to policy—which involves people making changes to their everyday lives, such as what they purchase and use—is there a role for clearer communication of the case for EVs from the Government? If so, who should take the lead on delivering that?

Clearer communication of the case from EVs from the Government may help, but this needs to be developed in partnership with the industry.

Peugeot UK recently polled UK drivers to ascertain the level of understanding of EVs, please see the link for further information: LESS THAN 25% OF UK DRIVERS SAY THEY HAVE A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES | Peugeot | Stellantis

  1. What is your view on the accuracy of the information in the public domain relating to EVs and their usage?

----

  1. What are the overall environmental benefits that would result from achieving the 2030 and 2035 targets?

----

  1. What are the likely costs that will be faced by consumers as a result of the Government’s phase-out dates for non-zero emissions vehicles? Are there policies or initiatives that the Government could use to specifically target barriers arising from unpredictable costs to the consumer, for example significant fluctuations in the cost of electricity, changes to road taxes, or the introduction of low emission zones?

To further support EV adoption, we would like to see continued targeted fiscal support for zero emission car customers both domestic and business and would like to see a review of motoring taxes to ensure the transition to EVs is not undermined.

If the Rules of Origin for batteries are tightened in 2024, there will be a significant tariff risk for many electrified vehicles. EVs traded between the UK and EU may be subject to between 10 and 22% tariffs, (tariff passenger cars, between 10%-22% tariff for vans). The tariffs will only apply to new electric vehicles, there are no tariffs applied for new ICE vehicle. Tariffs will lead to an increase in the Total Cost of Purchase of an EV for our customers.

 

EV Market and Acquiring an EV

These questions relate to the UK EV market and uptake of EVs by UK consumers.

  1. What are the main routes for acquiring an EV? Which aspects of these routes are working well, and which aspects could be improved?

There are several routes for acquiring an EV. We believe it is important to split this answer by channel, as the purchase journeys differ, highlighting aspects of each channel that are working well and aspects that could be improved.

The first channel to consider is fleet, the route through which customers can acquire an EV either through company car or salary sacrifice schemes. This channel provides tax incentives, such as 2% Benefit In Kind (BIK) to drive adoption. Low BIK has generated a new salary sacrifice channel, which targets non-company car drivers. From a Stellantis perspective, the fleet process is fully managed through a lease provider who in the majority of cases equip EV drivers with a home charger, which is either lease provider or employer funded. Many employers are still working out their requirements for on-site charging and reimbursements rates for business travel, as there are significant variations in costs of electricity to consider.

The second channel to consider is our Stellantis &You Motability scheme. Our Motability scheme offers very competitive rates to support the adoption of EVs and a free charging wallbox is provided.

In the third channel retail, we are seeing a decline in demand caused by high initial costs (Total Cost of Purchase) of EVs in comparison to ICE vehicles, and there are currently no consumer incentives such as plug-in car grants for passenger cars. In addition, the initial cost of a home charging unit is in the region of £1000, which is no longer government supported, combined with the high cost of electricity and overall anxiety of utility costs has seen a slowing of EV sales through retail channels. Overall, the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is now greater for EVs than previously. ‘Charge anxiety’ and the perceived lack of public charging infrastructure are additional barriers to purchase. Within the retail channel, the physical and digital sales journey is no different to the journey for ICE vehicle purchase.

Whilst fleet customers, those on company car schemes or salary sacrifice drivers, face the same charging and cost of electricity issues, they are more than offset by the BIK support. Therefore, we are seeing continued and growing take-up of EVs in this channel.

  1. What are the main consumer barriers to acquiring an EV, either through purchasing, leasing, or other routes?

We believe there are a number of consumer barriers to acquiring an EV, these include the continued high energy costs in the UK and therefore the perceived cost of running an EV. With the increasing raw materials costs, and the potential addition of tariffs applied relating to the tightening of the Rules of Origin in January 2024, these factors will continue to keep list prices high.

The removal of consumer incentives for purchase, such as plug-in car grant having been removed and the perceived lack and visibility of charging infrastructure and transparency of pricing at public chargers, all add to consumer barriers in making the switch to EVs.

  1.                     How is the Government helping to ensure that EVs are affordable and accessible for consumers, and are these approaches fit for purpose?

We note the recent news of the Tata Gigafactory in the UK, as underpinning the competitiveness of UK manufacturing is the need for a stable and local electrification supply chain. Battery supply is needed in the UK for UK production, with effective business models satisfying the needs and technology requirements of their customers.

To further support EV adoption, we would like to see continued targeted fiscal support for zero emission car customers both domestic and business and would like to see a review of motoring taxes to ensure the transition to EVs is not undermined.

As mentioned above, there needs to be greater confidence in the charging infrastructure and transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

  1.                     Do you think the range of EVs on offer in the UK is sufficient to meet market needs? Which segments are under-served and why? Why is the UK market not seeing low cost EVs, particularly in comparison to China?

Stellantis offers a wide range of vehicles, covering all major segments, through its brand portfolio from city cars and quadricycles with the Citroën AMI to Light Commercial Vehicles with the Vauxhall Vivaro. We are fully committed to achieve 100% zero emission new car sales in the UK and Europe by 2030 and our range will progressively move towards 100% electric, well ahead of legislation. For example, Fiat, Alfa Romeo and DS becoming fully electric by 2027 and Vauxhall by 2028.

Range technology has advanced and developed over time, and we believe perceived ‘range anxiety’ amongst consumers has reduced as a barrier to purchase but has been replaced by ‘charge anxiety’.

If the Rules of Origin for batteries are tightened in 2024, there will be a significant tariff risk for electrified vehicles. EVs traded amongst the UK and EU will be subject to between 10 and 22% tariffs, (tariff passenger cars, between 10%-22% tariff for vans). The tariffs will only apply to new electric vehicles, there are no tariffs applied for new ICE vehicle. Tariffs will lead to an increase in the Total Cost of Purchase of an EV for our customers.

  1.                     What is the future role of L-segment and personal light electric vehicles, and how will that impact car ownership and usage? What is inhibiting their uptake?

----

  1.                     What is your assessment of the current second-hand EV market? How is the second-hand EV market projected to develop between now and the phase out dates?

The increase in energy prices has meant the previous Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) advantages have reduced. In the last month, August 2023, we have seen a stabilisation in used EV values. Dealer confidence is returning, and we are now being approached for stock. We expect the used EV market will continue to grow. 

In conclusion, we are seeing demand is there from customers for EVs, a used EV being a more palatable option for many.

  1.                     What is the relationship between EV leasing and the second-hand market and how do they interrelate?

Leasing an EV can be a more accessible route to driving an EV, as monthly lease costs are lower than buying a vehicle outright with finance.  As the vehicle is often handed back to the supplier at the end of the agreement, rather than being purchased, it can give a regular supply of units into the used car market. 

Due to shortages during and following the Covid-19 pandemic, the number of new vehicles sold or leased decreased, and it will, therefore, take some time before the regular supply returns.

  1.                     What barriers are there to achieving a sufficient supply of second-hand EVs, mindful that second-hand vehicles make up a high proportion of all vehicles purchased?

There are several barriers to achieving a sufficient supply of second-hand EVs similar to the barriers to purchase. Ultimately, the vehicle has to be sold as new in the first instance to increase the number of EVs in circulation.

As mentioned above, with Government incentives having been removed for passenger cars and the ever present ‘charge anxiety’ is a risk for EV adoption through retail channels.

  1.                     What is the value and role of alternative transport models such as car clubs and micro mobility vehicles in the Government achieving the 2030 phase out date, and how should the Government consider their roles and opportunities for use in transport decarbonisation?

We believe there is a valuable role for alternative transport models such as micro mobility vehicles. We have launched the Citroën Ami and the Citroën Ami Buggy in the UK. This has initially been launched targeting retailer users for use as a second or third vehicle to be used in urban areas with speed limits 20/30 mph. The Ami was designed for micro-mobility use, short trips with a range of 47 miles and a top speed of 28mph.

 

There is scope for the Citroën Ami to be used as part of an urban mobility solutions as an alternative to public transport, similar to the concept in Paris, where it can be hired for used every 30 minutes.

 

In regard to car clubs, Stellantis agrees with the proposal within the ZEV Mandate to incentivise car clubs through the awarding of additional ZEV allowances.

 

  1.                     Are consumers charged higher rates of insurance for an EV when compared to an internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle, and if so, are these higher rates justified? Can the Government do anything to mitigate this?

----

Experience of using an EV

  1.                     What are the main challenges that UK consumers face in their use of EVs?

There needs to be greater confidence and visibility in the charging infrastructure – both in urban and rural locations, as well as residential on-street charging provision. From a recent Vauxhall campaign Electric Streets, we know 80% of electric vehicle charging is done at home and more than 60% of homes in urban areas, and an average of 40% across the country, do not have access to a driveway. In addition, 40% of company-owned electric vans are charged at home. 71.4% of UK councils have no published strategy in place for residential on-street charging provision.

 

There also needs to be an increase in the transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

 

  1.                     What are the main benefits that UK consumers could realise from using an EV?

There are many benefits that UK consumers could realise from using an EV. Firstly, once purchasing an EV a customer is driving a zero-emission vehicle contributing positively to net zero targets. In addition, EVs provide a new and silent driving experience.

  1.                     How prepared are car dealerships, service networks, repairs and maintenance organisations, breakdown services and aftermarket suppliers to meet the growing EV uptake?

----

  1.                     How does the charging infrastructure for EVs need to develop to meet the 2030 target? Does the UK need to adopt a single charging standard (e.g., the Combined Charging System (CCS)) or is there room in the market for multiple charger types?

There needs to be greater confidence and visibility in the charging infrastructure – both in urban and rural locations, as well as residential on-street charging provision. From a recent Vauxhall campaign Electric Streets, we know 80% of electric vehicle charging is done at home and more than 60% of homes in urban areas, and an average of 40% across the country, do not have access to a driveway. In addition, 40% of company-owned electric vans are charged at home. 71.4% of UK councils have no published strategy in place for residential on-street charging provision.

 

There also needs to be an increase in the transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

 

  1.                     The Government recently published the draft legislation of “Public Charge Point Regulations 2023”. What assessment have you made of the draft legislation text, and what contribution will it make in ensuring the charging experience is standardized and reliable for consumers?

---

  1.                     What assessment do you make of the requirements set out in the draft legislation of “Public Charge Point Regulations 2023” for charge point operators to make data free and publicly available, and how may this improve the EV charging experience for consumers?

---

  1.                     In terms of charging infrastructure, are there unique barriers facing consumers in areas of low affluence and/or multi-occupancy buildings, such as shared housing or high-rise flats? Do you consider public EV charging points to be accessible and equitable compared to home-charging points? What can be done to improve accessibility and equitability?

There needs to be greater confidence and visibility in the charging infrastructure – both in urban and rural locations, as well as residential on-street charging provision. From a recent Vauxhall campaign Electric Streets, we know 80% of electric vehicle charging is done at home and more than 60% of homes in urban areas, and an average of 40% across the country, do not have access to a driveway. Many of the 40% who can’t charge at home risk being left behind in the EV transition if they have no way of charging their cars using the most affordable and convenient method - the transition to EVs cannot leave behind those without access to home charging.

In addition, 40% of company-owned electric vans are charged at home. 71.4% of UK councils have no published strategy in place for residential on-street charging provision.

 

There also needs to be an increase in the transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

 

As referenced above, Vauxhall has recently launched a multi-year initiative with EV charging operators to enable local authorities to accelerate residential on-street charging. Vauxhall will support its charging operator partners in the education of councils, helping their understanding of EVs, to accelerate their tender processes and the installation of charging points in the residential on-street hotspots. This will be delivered through an Enablement Fund across the next 12 months. 

For further details please see the link: VAUXHALL LAUNCHES NEW INITIATIVE TO BOOST EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE AS INVESTIGATION REVEALS MORE THAN 70% OF UK COUNCILS HAVE NO CHARGING STRATEGY FOR RESIDENTIAL STREETS | Vauxhall | Stellantis

  1.                     Is there a financial benefit to the consumer of choosing an EV over an ICE vehicle? Are there further benefits, aside from financial, that a consumer may gain from EV use?

Although the initial Total Cost of Purchase of an EV is currently more than an ICE vehicle. When electricity prices decrease, the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and running costs will be lower. For company car drivers, there are also Benefit in Kind (BIK) taxation benefits, highlighted in the answer to question 8.

End of life disposal of EVs

  1.                     What options are there for consumers for end-of-life management of batteries and EVs, and what impact does this have on consumer attitudes towards buying an EV?

Stellantis has an established global Circular Economy process, as part of our ambitious global Dare Forward 2030 strategy.  Please see the overview below:

The primary objectives of this process are to extend the lifespan of our products, reducing the consumption of natural resources and materials, and to return material to the loop, reducing waste and energy.  Once our vehicles are sold, we work to extend their life through repairing, reconditioning, and the use of remanufactured or reused parts. When this is no longer possible and products reach end-of-life, we recycle as many materials as possible back into the manufacturing process.  

For batteries specifically, second life options extend the life of that battery, when it can no longer be used inside a vehicle or be remanufactured for another vehicle.  We have various projects ongoing for second life applications and uses of vehicles.  Battery recycling is the final stage for Stellantis. We have a solution ready to recycle today. We currently recycle EV batteries through external service providers that collect and recycle our EV batteries from all European markets, including the UK.

We also have an infrastructure in place to handle end-of-life vehicles, which is well established. Consumers can be confident that there is a network to handle their vehicle at end-of-life.

  1.                     What are the current regulations and responsibilities of disposal and recycling for EVs, and how effective are they? How much of the battery can be recycled from a technical standpoint, and how much of that is economically feasible?

We are currently working with or have provided inputs to Department of Business and Trade, Defra and the Environment Agency, for calls for evidence and information requests on the recycling for EVs. To have a healthy automotive ecosystem in the UK, we need production, consumer adoption and recycling capabilities. There is a need to build a circular supply chain including the repair, reconditioning, the use of remanufactured or reused parts and recycling.

On this topic, again we ask for a joined up, holistic cross Government departmental plan for strong support for the industry supporting the disposal and recycling of EVs.

An EV battery is a complex object made of several components that are composed using a variety of materials including both metals and plastics. The EU Batteries Regulation aims to promote the recovery of critical raw materials. In doing so, the objective is to reduce the EU's dependency on such materials from other countries.

Targets for recycling efficiency, material recovery and recycled content will be introduced gradually from 2025 onwards. All collected waste batteries will have to be recycled and high levels of recovery will have to be achieved, in particular of critical raw materials such as cobalt, lithium and nickel. This will guarantee that valuable materials are recovered at the end of their useful life and brought back in the economy by adopting stricter targets for recycling efficiency and material recovery over time.

In regard to the responsibilities, as a manufacturer, we have Extender Producer Responsibilities (EPR) applied to EV batteries. This means Stellantis is responsible, both legally and financially, for how EV batteries are taken care of at end-of-life. However, the manufacturer is not the owner of the EV battery at end-of-life. In many cases, the manufacturer does not have control of what exactly happens to an end-of-life EV battery, but we are technically responsible for it.

The Circular Economy approach of Stellantis (explained in answer 26) aims to extend the first life of a battery inside a vehicle for as long as possible so a customer can choose to keep the same battery the whole lifetime of the vehicle. To do that we are strongly promoting battery repair and remanufacturing activities that will be localised across our global operations. In the UK we have one Technical Centre already open in Coventry and more will follow.

Then, only when a battery is no longer used in a vehicle, we look to use batteries that still have sufficient State of Health (SoH) for applications outside the automotive industry. We refer to this as the second life or the refurbishing of a battery. Only as a last resort, or final stage, do we recycle a battery, meaning that the battery is destroyed and reduced back to its metal constituents that can then be used to make a new battery.

It is important to ensure end-of-life batteries are kept under control, collected, and are correctly sent to the supply chain avoiding leakage and losses outside the local territory (UK or EU). This is particularly important if legislation requires a minimum recycled content in new future batteries.

Stellantis is ready to take responsibility for battery collection and treatment at the end of their life but does not believe that Producer Responsibility Organisations (PROs) are the best solution, given EV batteries will be clearly identified and tracked. We also believe that if manufacturers are expected to bear the collection and recycling costs today, future possible associated benefits should be made preferentially available to them. For example, via a mechanism of “Right of the refusal”. By doing so, the manufacturer will be able to develop sustainable Circular Economy models and solutions, contributing to development of the UK economy.

The main costs in the end-of-life management of EV batteries are linked to the collection and transportation of the batteries especially in the case they are considered hazardous waste or unsafe and critical batteries. The EV battery recycling process is normally undertaken in two stages. The output of the first stage is a ‘black mass’, essentially a powder containing mixed main metals including Lithium, Nickel, Manganese and Cobalt. In the second stage of the EV battery recycling process, we separate the main metals and recover them in a form in which they can be used to make new EV batteries. The costs of the recycling process itself can be, at least partially, compensated by the revenues generated from the reuse of critical metals obtained from the black mass treatment. Therefore, in case of batteries with chemistries that use less amounts of critical raw materials the recycling costs may not be compensated.

 

  1.                     Is there a risk that the residual value of EVs may be lower than the value of the EV as a source of recoverable critical minerals, and how might this effect the flow of EVs into the second-hand market?

---

National and regional issues

  1.                     What are the challenges or concerns around grid capacity in relation to significantly increased EV adoption?

---

  1.                     What is the role of distribution network operators in ensuring EV infrastructure can be rolled out sufficiently to meet 2030 target?

---

  1.                     What are the requirements, challenges or opportunities for the development of public charge point delivery across the UK? How will the development of EV charging infrastructure in the UK interact with existing planning regulations?

There needs to be greater confidence and visibility in the charging infrastructure – both in urban and rural locations, as well as residential on-street charging provision. From a recent Vauxhall campaign Electric Streets, we know 80% of electric vehicle charging is done at home and more than 60% of homes in urban areas, and an average of 40% across the country, do not have access to a driveway. Many of the 40% who can’t charge at home risk being left behind in the EV transition if they have no way of charging their cars using the most affordable and convenient method - the transition to EVs cannot leave behind those without access to charging.

In addition, 40% of company-owned electric vans are charged at home. 71.4% of UK councils have no published strategy in place for residential on-street charging provision.

 

There also needs to be an increase in the transparency of pricing at public chargers. We support the existing calls for the reduction of VAT at public charge points to be aligned to domestic charging at 5%.

 

Vauxhall has recently launched a multi-year initiative with EV charging operators to enable local authorities to accelerate residential on-street charging. Vauxhall will support its charging operator partners in the education of councils, helping their understanding of EVs, to accelerate their tender processes and the installation of charging points in the residential on-street hotspots. This will be delivered through an Enablement Fund across the next 12 months. 

For further details please see the link: VAUXHALL LAUNCHES NEW INITIATIVE TO BOOST EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE AS INVESTIGATION REVEALS MORE THAN 70% OF UK COUNCILS HAVE NO CHARGING STRATEGY FOR RESIDENTIAL STREETS | Vauxhall | Stellantis

  1.                     What are the issues facing rural residents, urban residents, and sub-urban residents and how do they differ?

As previously mentioned, 80% of electric vehicle charging is done at home and more than 60% of homes in urban areas, and an average of 40% across the country, do not have access to a driveway. Many of the 40% who can’t charge at home risk being left behind in the EV transition if they have no way of charging their cars using the most affordable and convenient method - the transition to EVs cannot leave behind those without access to home charging.

In addition, 40% of company-owned electric vans are charged at home. 71.4% of UK councils have no published strategy in place for residential on-street charging provision.

 

  1.                     What role do you see local authorities playing in the delivering the 2030 phase out target, particularly in relation to planning regulations, charge points and working with District Network Operators? How can government best support local authorities in their roles?

Vauxhall has recently launched a multi-year initiative with EV charging operators to enable local authorities to accelerate residential on-street charging. Vauxhall will support its charging operator partners in the education of councils, helping their understanding of EVs, to accelerate their tender processes and the installation of charging points in the residential on-street hotspots. This will be delivered through an Enablement Fund across the next 12 months. 

For further details please see the link: VAUXHALL LAUNCHES NEW INITIATIVE TO BOOST EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE AS INVESTIGATION REVEALS MORE THAN 70% OF UK COUNCILS HAVE NO CHARGING STRATEGY FOR RESIDENTIAL STREETS | Vauxhall | Stellantis

 

International perspectives

  1.                     What are the successful approaches to the rollout and uptake of EVs in other countries, and what can the UK learn from these cases?

Successful approaches to the rollout and uptake of EVs in other countries tend to be the ones that offer an integrated policy, for example the approach adopted in Norway, who offer purchase incentives, differentiated (company) car taxation, infrastructure incentives, and ‘softer’ measures such as EV lanes and parking.

Successful approaches, across Europe, include making EVs more affordable through purchase incentives and lower taxation and deploying significant charging infrastructure, examples include Germany and France. On the contrary, countries with little or no support for EV purchase or infrastructure, are at risk of slower EV adoption, this can be seen in Italy, for example.