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Formal meeting (oral evidence session): UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?

International Relations and Defence Committee
UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?

Wednesday 3 November 2021

Start times: 10.00am (private) 10.00am (public)


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Committee holds session on maritime economics, law and security

The House of Lords International Relations and Defence Committee will take evidence from academic experts on maritime law and security, and the maritime economy.

The Committee will ask questions on maritime security, human rights at sea and regulation of the economic uses of the sea and seabed.

Meeting details

At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Inquiry UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?
Assistant Professor in Public International Law at Panteion University
Professor, Faculty of Law at University of New South Wales, Australia
At 11.00am: Oral evidence
Inquiry UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?
Senior Lecturer, Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law at Swansea University
Senior Lecturer in Law at Cardiff Law School

Possible questions:

  • To what extent is the international law of the sea able to respond to new and emerging challenges and threats? Is there a need for new regulations? If yes, what should they be?
  • What are the challenges to the effective implementation of human rights at sea? What enforcement mechanisms exist (or are needed) to pursue infringements of human rights law at sea?
  • To what extent do the existing international legal frameworks for maritime security, including UNCLOS, account for the use of Maritime Autonomous Vehicles (MAVs) by both states and non-state actors?
  • What are the challenges to the submarine cables?
  • What are the consequences of illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, and how well are these challenges addressed by states and international law? Who are the ‘serial’ offenders, and are there any mechanisms currently able to tackle them?
  • What are the new and emerging economic uses of the sea? How well does the current law of the sea deal with them? Might these new uses of the sea require new forms of regulation?

Location

Room 4, Palace of Westminster

How to attend