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Formal meeting (oral evidence session): New technologies and the application of the law

Justice and Home Affairs Committee
New technologies and the application of the law

Tuesday 7 September 2021

Start times: 10.00am (private) 10.00am (public)


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Lords Committee to explore algorithmic tools for law enforcement 

The House of Lords Justice and Home Affairs Committee draws international comparisons in the use of algorithmic tools for law enforcement, as it questions experts from across the globe for its inquiry into new technologies and the application of the law.

  

Meeting details

At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Inquiry New technologies and the application of the law
Director New Zealand Law Foundation Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies at University of Otago
Co-Director, Surveillance Studies Network, associate professor Tilburg University/Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)
Martin Luther King Jr. Professor of Law at University of California, Davis

The committee will seek to explore the use of advanced algorithmic tools in activities to discover, deter, rehabilitate, or punish people who breach the law.  Witnesses will discuss how algorithmic tools for law enforcement are deployed in their countries and where this has been particularly successful - or otherwise.  

Possible questions

  • How are advanced technologies being used for the application of the law in Belgium, New-Zealand, and the United States of America?
  • How has the use of advanced technologies for the application of the law evolved over time in your respective countries? Is the overall trend towards the upscaling or descaling of capabilities?
  • What do you view as the most appropriate sphere of government at which to regulate the use of advanced technologies for the application of the law: local, national, regional, or global?
  • What transparency mechanisms are in place in your respective countries, and how successful are they?
  • Have you come across examples from your respective jurisdictions in which human-machine interaction has been particularly problematic or particularly successful?
  • Seen from abroad, is anything particularly noteworthy about the way advanced technologies are being used (or not used), for the application of the law in England and Wales?

 

Further information

Location

Room 2, Palace of Westminster

How to attend