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Formal meeting (oral evidence session): Adult Social Care

Adult Social Care Committee
Adult Social Care

Monday 23 May 2022

Start times: 3.15pm (private) 3.45pm (public)


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Lords Committee to explore raising the profile of adult social care  

On Monday, 23 May 2022, the Adult Social Care Committee will have its tenth and eleventh public evidence sessions to explore the assumptions and preconceptions about those who rely on care, and different methods of raising the profile of adult social care. The first evidence session will focus on the stigma and discrimination attached to care needs, both for older adults and adults of working age. The second evidence session will consider whether by changing the lens through which society looks at social care, it is possible to design a system that makes better use of resources and leads to better outcomes for the older and working-age adults who need it.

  • This evidence session is due to be held remotely and streamed on Parliament TV.
  • The Committee’s work can be followed on its website and via Twitter.

Meeting details

At 3.15pm: Private discussion
Inquiry Adult Social Care
At 3.45pm: Oral evidence
Inquiry Adult Social Care
Head of Policy at Disability Rights UK
Senior Evidence Manager at Centre for Ageing Better
At 4.40pm: Oral evidence
Inquiry Adult Social Care
Head of TLAP at Think Local Act Personal (TLAP)
Co-chair of National Co-Production Advisory Group at Think Local Act Personal (TLAP)
Chair at Bolton NHS (National Health Service) Foundation Trust, and Former Chief Executive at Wigan Council
At 5.35pm: Private discussion
Inquiry Adult Social Care

Themes for discussion

  1. The current dominant narrative around older people and the ageing process, and to what extent this narrative is accurate.                                                  
  2. The most effective way to challenge this narrative, and ageism as a whole, through legislation, cultural change and behavioural change.                            
  3. The extent to which the dominant narrative around disabled people and working-age adults with care needs differs from the narrative around older people.                                                                                                        
  4. The extent to which the National Disability Strategy offer avenues for changing the narrative around disability and care needs.                                                 
  5. The implementation within Wigan Council of a new vision and understanding of social care services in the form of the Wigan Deal on Adult Social Care.              
  6. The evidence (if any) from the Wigan Deal on Adult Social Care to demonstrate that it is in local authorities’ best interest, including in their economic interest, to change their approach to care.

Further information

Location

Virtual meeting (webcast)