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Submissions wanted on the Devolution of Air Passenger Duty to Wales

11 September 2018

The Welsh Affairs Committee launches an inquiry examining the arguments for and against the devolution of Air Passenger Duty (APD) to Wales, what impact devolution would have on Welsh airports, and how passengers would be affected.

APD is a tax levied by the Government on passengers flying out of the UK and applies to both short- and long-haul flights. It is a reserved matter in Wales and the UK Government therefore sets rates of APD for both England and Wales. HMRC estimates that Wales currently contributes £11 million in Air Passenger Duties to the UK Treasury, which is the equivalent of 0.4% of UK APD revenues.

Chair's comments

Launching the inquiry, Committee Chair David T. C. Davies MP said:

"Since the Silk Commission published its findings in 2012, we have seen the devolution of APD on long-haul flights to the Northern Ireland Assembly, and in full to the Scottish Parliament. The debates for and against similar steps in Wales have also continued.

With these developments in mind, our inquiry will examine the various options on the table for addressing the APD question, how they would impact airports in Wales and beyond, and how passengers would be affected. We will also seek to draw lessons from the Scottish experience, and look forward to commencing our work on this important issue."

Call for written submissions

The Welsh Affairs Committee has decided to examine the arguments for and against the devolution of Air Passenger Duty to Wales. It would welcome submissions addressing some or all of the following points:

  • The potential benefits and drawbacks of devolving Air Passenger Duty to the National Assembly for Wales.
  • What impact devolution would have on Welsh airports, including those not currently operating international flights.
  • Different options for the devolution of Air Passenger Duty, including full devolution, or devolution for long-haul flights only.
  • How Air Passenger Duty fits with responsibilities that are already devolved, such as regional economic development, aspects of environmental policy and tourism.
  • Cross-border issues, including the impact on passengers and airports in England.
  • The impact devolution would have on North Wales and airports used by people in North Wales.
  • Lessons learned from the devolution of Air Passenger Duty to Scotland.

Further information

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